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Last update: Sunday Apr 30, 2017

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David Cunningham
 

DAVID CUNNINGHAM

www.davidhcunningham.com

David Cunningham's Paintings have been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in galleries and museums throughout the United States including the Water Tower Exhibition in Louisville, Kentucky and the Stage Galleries' Small Works: Top Priority show in New York City.

David Cunningham

In addition, his work is found in both public and corporate collections including: St Meinrad Monastery,The University of Evansville, Fifth Third Bank and Vectren Corporation.

Mr. Cunningham is the recipient of numerous awards and honors. Recently, he was given the Eli Lilly Award of Distinction in a show juried by curator Lawrence Rinder of the Whitney Museum.

David Cunningham was born in Carmel California in 1974 and was raised in Chattanooga, Tennessee. He currently lives in Indianapolis Indiana where he is a professor of Art at Franklin College.

"The creative process involved in painting is a spiritual practice for me that engages my mind, body and spirit in a deep and challenging way. The complexity of painting fully engages me in a way that I can be taken into another dimension free from the confines of time, fear, and distractions. I can describe this experience as nothing less than divine. In addition, I see painting as a process of self-discovery. Upon contemplation of the finished piece, I find that the work reflects my personality, my thoughts (conscious and subconscious), and my vision of the world around me. In this way painting provides me with valuable insights into my psyche.

The process of painting has been one in which thematic ideas remain vague and planted in my head often for months or years before anything happens. I begin my work by arranging and rearranging personal objects that I have been collected throughout my life. I look for alignments and connections of shapes, color and content. In addition to moving and shifting objects, I work with different lighting in attempt to find that magic moment that excites me. This process can take days or hours, but I try never to start something until it has that spark of vitality the moves the still life into the metaphysical realm. The painting process begins very loose and quickly. As I work, the painting takes over and begins dictating my next move. Objects start to lock into place and the painting slows down till often I am spending days on one small section. Nearing completion, I am always amazed when I start to see new thematic symbols and connections I had never consciously intended. It is in this process that I see a higher order at work in me.

I find the world to be a place of duality: the yin and yang, emotion and intellect, order and chaos, geometry and nature, reason and intuition, male and female. Often these dualities are seen as mutually exclusive. I believe that one finds that they coexist beautifully in God. It is in this way of thinking that I make work that pays homage to the existence of simultaneous dualities.

I have always loved the magic of creating three dimensional illusion on a two dimensional surface. It is only recently that I have attempted to move beyond the imitation of nature and toward the creation of my own visual world. This world is one in which the linear reality of the intellect (pattern) is combined with the sensory reality of the eyes (volume and form) creating pattern relationships on the picture plane that often flatten and contradict space. The work invites the audience to look at the world through my eyes, to see beyond the surface and to find comfort in the beautiful order that exists even in what appears to be chaos."

Source: http://www.davidhcunningham.com



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